Thursday, February 11, 2010

All of a sudden, I don't hate Kindle quite as much...

...Hell, I must grow to like the thing. Of course, I'd still want a paper version of my work still around, and I'm not sure this would help publishers in the long run.

6 comments:

Randal Graves said...

Bah humbug. Down with Kindle, up with pulpy gluey, dangnabbit.

Cormac Brown said...

Randal,

Hopefully this will spur publishers to give writers more favorable royalty rates.

sunshine said...

I guess if the books are just going to be exclusively electronic (for awhile anyhow) they SHOULD get higher royalty rates.
If the publishing firm doesn't have to print out the books they aren't out the cost.

Of course you get people like me that needs to have a book or magazine in her hand to really be able to read something. Reading off of a computer screen drives me insane.
So, everyone should get a higher royalty rate,... right?

I'm with Randal. Down with Kindle! :P

((Hugs))
Laura

Cormac Brown said...

Laura,

I...

...am no fan of Kindle.

That being said, there some benefits to it. The fact that some authors that publishing houses would never take a chance on, could have the mighty Amazon sign them on and promote them. There is also the aforementioned change in the royalty landscape. Above all though, I will still be loyal to print...first and foremost.

Randal Graves said...

Oh no, I see the financial merits of it for writers (who, like all artists in a just world, would be flush with green while MIC jerkoffs would be cleaning gutters), I just hope that such things WILL spur actual bookery to return a bit. Can't count on a Harry Potter-esque blockbuster all the time to remind Murkans that reading stuff beyond self-help and narcissistic memoirs of the talking hairpiece of the month are worth it.

Cormac Brown said...

Randal,

As other blogs have pointed out, E-books in general, might be the way to lure back the ADD-addled Twits to literature.

Of course, you can't lend an Ebook, buy one at a used book store, or get one at a library. Which would preclude most San Franciscians (and other cost of living-challenged burgs) from discovering new authors.